Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button
Technorati button
Reddit button
Myspace button
Linkedin button
Webonews button
Delicious button
Digg button
Flickr button
Stumbleupon button
Newsvine button
Youtube button

The United States Air Force Honor Guard History

The military stands on ceremony and that is never more evident than when an Honor Guard is present. The United States Air Force Honor Guard was activated in September of 1948 under the command of two officers with 98 enlisted men under them.

It was assigned to the Air Police Squadron until 1972, when it became its own separate unit. Each Air Force Base has its own Base Honor Guard, with members selected from different units stationed on the base.

The Air Force also has an Honor Guard unit that is permanently assigned to Bolling AFB in Washington, D.C. This is a three year long assignment and Air
Force members stationed around the world apply to be part of this elite unit. Members of this unit are often referred to as Ceremonial Guardsman.

The Air Force has used the Base Honor Guard for honors at military funerals since 1972; however, it wasn’t until 1995 that Air Force establish the Protocol, Honors, and Ceremonies course to ensure that all he funeral honors ceremony are performed the same each time. This course provided much needed guidance on everything the Honor Guard is tasked to do, including military funeral procedures and the uniform required. It is still used today and many times, the Honor Guard may go to Washington, D.C. for formal training at Bolling AFB. In some cases, a trainer from Bolling may be sent to provide the training.

Click here

In 2000, the Natural Defense Authorization Act was implemented, which provides for all veterans to receive military funeral honors. These honors include the folding of the United States flag and the presentation of this flag to the veteran’s next living relative. “Taps” is also performed by a member of the Base Honor Guard. Any service member who was honorably and had at least six months serviced time is considered an eligible veteran. Veterans’ funeral honors are performed by two or three members of the Base Honor Guard.

Retired members of the Air Force who completed 20 years or more are entitled
to the “Standard Honors” for a military funeral. This ceremony involves six pallbearers, a six man flag fold, the playing of ‘Taps,” and the “21 gun salute.” The flag is presented to the next-of-kin and three of the shell cases from the rifle salute may also be presented.

Active-duty members receive a Full Honors Ceremony. This ceremony is performed by twenty Honor Guard members. There are six pallbearers, four color guard members, one bugler, seven members of the firing party, one NCO in charge firing party, and one officer in charge of the entire detail. A flyover may be authorized if the fallen service member was on flying status. This formation is often called the “Missing Man” formation.

The Air Force Honor Guard recognizes the service and sacrifice of fallen Air Force members and veterans in a very solemn and dignified manner. It’s a last tribute and it means a great deal to family and friends.For those that are tasked with this honorable detail, an Air Force Honor Guard ring is a great way to say thank you for their volunteer service.

For more information on Air Force rings, click United States Air Force

Military Class Rings

Whether you are graduating from high school or the armed forces, Army-Rings
you or your family would probably like to mark the occasion with
a special gift or token. After all it’s a very special moment
in any person’s life and a very proud moment; you’ve worked hard,
sacrificed a lot of your time and were disciplined to
apply yourself to get through.

Military Class Rings make a great gift
Military class rings are available for all members of the armed force
and for affiliate members. All special occasions can be marked and commemorated
by the customization of these rings from the text on the sides to the images
that represent the various departments of the service. We shall give you some
information of what’s available and how you can proceed to create
and design your military class ring.

Military Class Rings for the Navy
Graduating from Great Lakes, Norfolk or California on any give weekend you can observe the pride in any every person’s demeanour from the proud parents who know that they have given their son or daughter the best chance in life. The Naval Training Officers who put these young people through their paces with assertive control and courteous authority and hope the will uphold the honor and integrity of the Navy. Military class rings can be customized with emblems such as the Dept. of Navy Seal, Seabees and Chief Petty Officer and hundreds of other designs that you can view on the military ring site.

Customize a Military Ring

Click here

Military Class Rings for the Army
The Army is one of the largest departments in the armed forces and whether you have trained in Ft. Knox, Ft. Lee you will also be able design a military class ring to represent your chosen unit or brigade in the Army.

Deployment Rings 
Deployment rings are very popular especially those with images of “Operation Iraqi Freedom” or “Operation Enduring Freedom” as these campaigns will play a huge part in the history of America and indeed th world. It is quite possible that during your deployments you have spent time in Kuwait and visited the post here in the picture. I myself spent many a day on this post in the searing heat of the summer and during those harsh windy winter evenings.

Military Class Rings for the Marines
Camp Lejune or Camp Pendleton if you’re a Marine then you have probably spent most of your earlier days on one of these two posts. Most of you will have met some of your life long friends when doing your training under a drill sergeant that you thought was the devil but now realize he was most of the time your best friend. The training that was hard to endure at the time has probably help save your life and that of your colleagues. We have beautiful custom marine rings for you to choose from and with the selection of side images you will find something appropriate.

Military Class Rings for the Air Force
Flying high above the clouds in some place around the world you would expect to find a pilot flying an Air Force F-16 or some other make of military jet. What have they in common? Well they have been trained on one of the finest Air Bases located throughout the United States. These are the most disciplined pilots in the world and are constantly monitored for their alertness and fitness. They travel at the speed of sound and one tiny mistake can have disastrous results. The extensive selection of designs will enable you to create the perfect military class ring for these fine and brave young men and women.

For more information on military rings, click here

Air Force Rings are a Proud Tradition

Air Force Rings a family tradition. The United States Air Force air force ring
Academy is located in Colorado and is actually the youngest
of the military academies. Graduating its first class in 1959,
the Academy takes in about 1,400 new students each year.
Of those 1,400, about 1,000 graduate. Upon graduation,
most are commissioned as 2nd Lieutenants
in the United States Air Force.

On important component of the Air Force Academy is the
Air Force class ring. Each year, the two class rings are collected
and added to the ingot used to create the rings.
This means a piece of each academy class before is in each class’s rings.

This tradition is one that brings a lot of pride and honor to those who graduate
from the United States Air Force Academy. The designs of the ring may not all
be similar, but most are created from white gold, as yellow gold is not
authorized for academy class rings.

Click here

There are many other types of Air Force rings, too. Many enlisted men and women have this special military ring created to remember their service and dedication. Others have them created to give as gifts in appreciation for an Air Force member’s sacrifice and commitment.

For more information on Military rings, click here

Air Force Pararescue – “That Others May Live”

USAF_Atlas_W_BlueZircon-248x300
There is more to the Air Force Pararescue team than
just providing emergency medical treatment.

These highly trained members of the Air Force evacuate
the injured, act as aircrew gunners, provide various flight duties,
and provide landing sites for NASA missions. The history of this
Special Forces unit is quite a story and it sheds some light on
why it is considered one of the most unique units in the military today.

In 1943, 21 people jumped out of a C-46 that was in trouble over
a jungle near the Burma/China Border.

The crash site was in a such a remote area that the only way to get help to those
who survived was by parachuting into the area.

Two medical corpsmen and Lt. Colonel Fleckinger volunteered to parachute in.
This was the beginnings of the idea for a Pararescue unit. For over a month, these three men,
with the help of natives, took care of the injured until they could be taken out of the jungle.

One of those rescued individuals, Eric Severeid, a news commentator, described the men as “gallant.” The Pararescue unit of the Air Force was founded. Since that time, rescues have occurred almost everywhere in the world. In South East Asia, during Vietnam, Pararescuemen risked their lives on multiple occasions to get aid to and evacuate friendly forces that needed immediate help. There were 19 Air Force Crosses awarded to enlisted airmen during Vietnam and ten of those medals were awarded to Pararescuemen.

Even in times of peace, the functions of this unit are done every day. They provide medical treatment for injured men and women. The maroon beret, a symbol of those who serve in this elite unit, represents the blood sacrificed and the duty to aid others. “That Others May Live” is a fitting motto for this organization.

A Pararescue SCUBA team was credited for saving the astronauts of Gemini 8. The team deployed from Naha Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. They arrived just in time to watch as Gemini 8 hit the water. They parachuted into the ocean and attached flotation equipment within just twenty minutes. They remained with the astronauts until a Navy destroyer was able to pick them all up.

Click here

The training is extensive, to say the least. This unit is constantly striving for new ways to provide recovery and medical aid to those who need it. One of the major developments for the unit came when they incorporated scuba techniques with that of parachuting. A Pararescueman can jump with up to 170 lbs. of equipment on his back.

Pararescuemen are not just utilized to save American lives. For example, on two different occasions, this unit was called to provide aid to two Russian seamen. One was badly burned aboard a Russian ship that was 700 miles away from land. Two Pararescuemen in the Azores parachuted into the ocean near the ship and stayed aboard the ship to provide treatment until the ship could reach port. Just two weeks later, a Russian sailor was severely injured in a fall aboard a Russian fishing boat. Three Pararescuemen provided aid until the ship was close enough to shore that a Coast Guard cutter could pick up the injured man and get him to shore.

The list of those who have been helped by the Air Force Pararescuemen goes on and on. This is a very specialized unit and only a few will pass the rigorous training program. Those who do often wear Air Force Pararescue rings. These rings are a fantastic reminder of their sacrifice and service to those in need.

For more information on Honorable rings, click here

Air Force Gifts for Father’s day

Father’s Day is rapidly approaching and as usual, many
people are racking their brains trying to come up with a gift that
their dad, husband, or other man in their life will love.

It’s not always an easy task. If your loved one serves in the Air Force, then
consider giving him one of the many Air Force gifts available today. You can easily
find a great gift idea for Father’s Day that compliments their service
and sacrifice in this branch of the United States Armed Forces.

The most difficult part about buying Air Force gifts is deciding which one
the recipient will want the most. However, probably the most important
factor to consider is how much you want to spend.

Many Air Force gifts are very affordable and can be found for under $30.
There are other Air Force gifts that can cost you several hundreds of dollars,
such as a gold Air Force ring.

Your budget matters and that’s certainly indicative of just about any purchase today.
So what are you going to get your Air Force man for Father’s Day?

Probably one of the most common gifts for both airman and officers is a piece of
Air Force clothing. You’ll find hats, t-shirts, sweatshirts, jackets, and even underwear
all designed with the Air Force in mind. Some can be personalized with the member’s
name, rank, and unit, while others are nothing more than a way to poke fun at the
rest of the military or at a specific branch. Let’s face it – there is certainly a bit of
competition among the various branches of the Armed Forces.

If clothing isn’t quite what you had in mind, how about Air Force gifts that are specific
to the aircraft that your loved works on or is associated with. The Air Force has many
different types of aircraft and each plays a vital role in successful missions,
including those that require fighter capabilities, transporting troops and supplies,
or providing other types of support. The men and women that work on these aircraft
are the reason why the Air Force is such a powerful entity. When Father’s Day rolls
around, gifts that focus on these aircraft are a great gift idea.

Military jewelry is also a great gift and one that is sure to become a treasure to the recipient.
Consider an Air Force ring, a pendant, or a watch. Military rings and watches are the
most common military gifts, but for Father’s Day, a pendant that comes in two parts is an excellent choice.

One half of the pendant can be worn by a son or daughter and the other half is to be worn by Dad.
There are also two piece pendants that are a great choice for a husband and wife.
Watches can be engraved on the back with the date and a short message
and the face of the watch can be one of the many Air Force emblems.
These are great gift ideas for Father’s Day that are sure to make this
holiday one that is remembered for years to come.

For more information on Air Force Gifts, click here

Air Force Gifts – Aim High!

The Air Force is one of the smaller branches of the Armed Forces, but
that doesn’t make it any less important. These men and women provide safety in the skies above our country, protection for our forces deployed overseas, and strategic bombing when needed. The support and maintenance units help ensure that the aircraft are ready for action at a moment’s notice.

If you want to give Air Force gifts to your friends or family members who serve this country, then you’re in luck! There are many great gift ideas that will delight the Air Force member in your life. Some are very elegant. Others are useful. Still more are great for gag gifts! First decide which type of gift that you want to give.

Click here

For those that want an elegant and formal Air Force gift, then consider Air Force jewelry, such as rings, pendants, key chains, earrings, and bracelets. These are beautiful tokens of a military member’s service and most can be personalized with a short message or important date. These gifts will really resonate with your airman or officer, as everyone loves to receive a gift that is specifically made for them.

Other formal Air Force gifts include shadowboxes and display cases. You can fill a display case with the airman’s medals, photos, and patches. This is a great idea for someone who is retiring or just received a promotion. Other Air Force gifts might include a personalized desk set, a plaque honoring the recipient’s service, or even set of engraved glasses.
For those that love military clothing, there are so many Air Force gifts that run down this line. Jackets and hats are two of the most popular, but t-shirts and sweats are right behind. Many of the t-shirts poke fun at another branch of the military, as the competition between the branches is high. In addition, you can find some great Air Force scarves, boxers, and even socks that most people will really enjoy receiving as a gift.

Most members of the Air Force have spent time deployed in support of military operations around the world.
These deployments are quite difficult on their friends and family, as well as on themselves.
However, there is a great deal of pride in serving their country across the globe.
Consider giving Air Force gifts that recognize these military operations,
such as Operations Desert Storm, Desert Shield, and Iraqi Freedom.
Your friend or family member will appreciate the recognition for such service.

You may also want to consider honoring an Air Force
Veteran who served in such conflicts as Vietnam or Korea.
In closing, when consider which of the many Air Force gifts will be best received,
think about what type of job the airman has and where he or she has been stationed.
This will help you choose the best gift possible,
but remember that it’s the show of appreciation for their service, sacrifice, and
dedication that really matters to your military friend or family member.

For more information on honorable rings, click here

The hurricane hunters of the air force reserve

The 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron is one of a king. It is the only DOD organization that still flies into hurricanes and tropical storms and it’s been doing so since 1944. What actually started on a dare has grown into a full fledged squadron responsible for tracking, measuring, and reporting on tropical storms and hurricanes.

Equipped with ten WC-130J aircraft, this squadron is stationed in Biloxi, Mississippi at Kessler Air Force Base. The aircraft and crew are part of the 403rd Wing. With a history over fifty years, traced back to the 3rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron. However, during this time, the B-17 was the aircraft of choice for weather reconnaissance during World War 11.  In September 1945, the 53rd became the first to fly into a hurricane intentionally. It became their primary mission, however, and the name “Hurricane Hunters” seemed very fitting.

For the next several decades, the squadron was deployed around the world. Because there wasn’t satellite communications, the 53rd would become responsible for collecting and transmitted data to weather stations all over the planet. These weather stations would prepare forecasts for the U.S. Weather Bureau and the United States Air Force.  Another type of aircraft that was often used was the WB-25 Mitchell. This was a medium sized bomber that ended up with a variety of missions.

Click here

It wasn’t until 1947 that the United States Weather Bureau would begin their hurricane warning service. In 1953, all hurricanes would be given the names of women. It was a way for the public to easily track the hurricanes. Several experiments were conducted by the 53rd with the help of the Weather Bureau. One experiment tried to diminish the intensity of a hurricane by spraying the clouds with dry ice particles. Unfortunately, this was not effective.

Once WWII had ended, the 53rd inherited several WB-29 Superfortress aircraft. This was the first aircraft that was designed for the weather service with the letter “W.” This was also the first aircraft that flew above a hurricane at an altitude of 22,000 feet. A special assignment, though, was still to come.

In 1953, the squadron was flying daily into the far north and the children of the crew and other personnel wanted their letters delivered to Santa. The word quickly spread and suddenly there were letters to Santa pouring in from all over the world. The 53rd would be responsible for those letters for years to come.

There were other aircraft that were used by the 53rd over the years. The WB-47 Stratojet would eventually be replaced by the WC-130 Hercules in 1963. After Hurricane Camille hit the Gulf Coast in 1969, Congress wanted the Hurricane Hunters to be closer to the Coast. By 1973, they got their request and the 53rd moved to Keesler Air Force Base in Mississippi.

In 1975, the Air Force Reserve would activate the 815th Weather Reconnaisance Squadron. Nicknamed the “Storm Trackers,” many combined missions with the 53rd would earn respect throughout the Armed Forces. In 1991, the 53rd would be deactivated due to budget cuts and the entire mission of hurricane hunting would go to the 815th.  The combination of tactical airlift missions and storm hunting would prove too much for one squadron, however. The weather squadron brought back the “Hurricane Hunters” and the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron carries on the tradition today.

If you or a loved one have served with the 53rd or the 815th, then you should celebrate that services with one of the many styles of Air Force rings. You can easily customize an Air Force ring with one of the hundreds of different insignia, symbols, and emblems that are available. In addition, you can have the inside of the band engraved with a personal message.

The 100th air refueling wing – A critical air refueling bridge

The 100th Air Refueling Wing is part of the
United States Air Force and stationed at RAF
Mildenahll, England. It is the only U.S. air
refueling wing that is permanent in Europe. It provides the critical air refueling “bridge” that allows the US Air Force to Deploy anywhere in the world on a moment’s notice.
The 100th ARW was originally called the 100th Bombardment Group. It originally was a B-17 Flying Fortress unit that was stationed at RAF Thorpe Abbotts in England. There were two Disguised Unit Citations given to this unit during and after World War II. This unit flew over 300 missions and suffered great losses during combat. Over 170 aircraft would be missing in action. On April 20, 1945, the unit flew its last mission.
The 100th ARW is comprised of 15 KC-135 aircraft. The unit has over 16,000 personnel, which are assigned to four bases. The 100th ARW was first stationed at Beale, AFB, California. There were no personnel or equipment when this unit first started. Eventually, the 17th Bombardment Wing’s KC-135 Stratotankers were absorbed by the 100th ARW. It assumed the responsibility for worldwide air refueling support from September 1976 until March 1983. It was then taken over by the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing.

Click here

For the next seven years, the unit would remain inactive. In July 1990, the 100th ARW was reactivated, but with a new name – the 100th Air Division. Its new home would be Whiteman AFB, Missouri. It would only be a year, however, before the unit would be deactivated again. Finally, in 1992, the 100th ARW was reactivated in RAF Mildenhall. This is the long refueling wing for the Air Force in Europe.
The premier aircraft, the KC-135 Stratotanker is quite a unique aircraft. It was the Air Force’s first jet powered refueling tanker. It has been used extensively since the Vietnam War and it tremendously extends the range and endurance of almost all of the U.S. Military’s bombers and tactical fighters. It has been in service with the Air Force for over fifty years, making it only one of six aircraft to carry that distinction. Despite the increasing costs associated with maintenance, studies have shown that many of these aircraft can be safely flown until 2040. The KC-46 is the expected replacement.
The KC-135 has a multi-point refueling system, allowing it to refuel many different kinds of US aircraft, but also most of the NATO tactical jet aircraft, as well. It can also refuel two aircraft at the same time. It can hold up to 31,275 gallons of fuel and requires a crew of three. However, there is also room for up to 37 passengers.
If you or a loved one is part of the 100th ARW, then you might consider an Air Force ring. There are beautiful insignias and emblems for the 100th ARW available that you can have engraved on the sides. The inside of the band can also be personalized with an engraving. These Air Force rings are a terrific way to show your support for these men and women of the 100 AWR and they make a fantastic gift idea.

You may check more information on Air Force Rings here

174th fighter wing – 4 time USAF outstanding unit

The 174th Fighter Wing was originally formed as the  USAF_Atlas_W_BlueZircon-248x300
138th Fighter Squadron on October 28, 1947. It was
the first Air National Guard  Unit in New York State after
World War II. P-47D Thunderbolts were the first aircraft
assigned at Hancock Field, which once was a
base for the Army Air Force.

The first jet fighters arrived in 1950, which were the F-84B Thunderjets.
It didn’t take long for this base to become the main jet fighter
training base for the state of New York. In 1957, the 138th
Fighter Squadron was assigned to Tactical Air Command when
the F-86H Sabres arrived. This would begin what become a long
tradition of providing close air support as their primary mission.

President John F. Kennedy mobilized the 138th Fighter
Squadron in 1961 and it was under the control of the 102nd
Tactical Fighter Wing. During the Berlin Crisis, the unit was called to active duty.

The unit was deployed to Platsbourg-Bourscheid Air Base for almost two years. Upon returning to the United States, the unit would be renamed the 174th Tactical Fighter Group.

Over the next two decades, the 174th Tactical Fighter Group would be called to active duty again. It was sent to Cannon AFB in New Mexico for the Pueblo Crisis. In 1979, the 174th would change from a flying group to a wing. It would have a new aircraft, too: the A-10A Thunderbolt II. In 1988, the first F-16A Fighting Falcon would arrive. This 174th would become the testing grounds for F-16A with a 30mm gun pod. The role of close air support was still its main mission. The year the F-16As arrived, the unit would receive the Air Force’s Outstanding Maintenance Squadron Award.

Click here

In 1991, the 174th would deploy in support of Desert Storm, with 516 members. During Operation Desert Storm, the 174th was one of only two Air National Guard units that flew combat missions. The Air Force Outstanding Unit Award, along with the device for valor was awarded upon the unit’s return.

In 1992, the unit would get its current designation as the 174th Fighter Wing. Two deployments to Incirlik, Turkey would come between 1995 and 1997. These deployments were in support of Operation Northern Watch and Operation Provide Comfort II. The F-16As were also upgraded to F-16Cs, known as the Fighting Falcon. The F-16C would depart Hancock Field for the last time in 2010, when the 174th Fighter Wing would take on the MQ-9 Reaper, which is an unmanned combat aircraft.

If you or someone you know has served with the 174th Fighter Wing, consider ordering an Air Force ring as a reminder of the service and sacrifice necessary to make this Fighter Wing so successful. The 174th has been awarded the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 4 times, showing the high level of commitment in this unit. There is no better way to recognize this dedication than with one of the many styles of Air Force rings. Each Air Force ring can be personalized and shipped to almost anywhere in the world.

You may check more information on Air Force Rings here

Air Force Rings: Three Tips for Designing the Perfect Ring!

The Air Force has been an integral part of the United States military.
From the fighter pilot to the logistics officers and everyone in between, Air Force personnel stationed and deployed around the world work to preserve our freedom.

Remember the greatest gifts you can create for for an Air Force hero is a custom made ring !